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Twitter’s always been about speed and immediacy. It’s where news breaks,…

Twitter’s constantly been about speed and immediacy. It’s where news breaks, it’s where subjects pattern, it’s where your timeline zips so quick you’re bound to miss out on things. In an effort to make itself a more long-term house for all that information, Twitter has actually revealed that you can explore every tweet sent on the service since 2006. Twitter has always kept tweets permanently (that’s not just up to the Library of Congress), however, used to purge tweets from the search index after only a few days or weeks. The brand-new search engine implies that you’ll be able to browse for that tweet from ’08 where your friend DM-failed and never discovered, or that link somebody tweeted at you two years back. It also implies you’ll be able to read back through tweets during the impressive World Cup Final. SEARCH FINDS OLD THINGS, BUT STILL FAVORS THE NEW In the meantime, it’s a relatively simple engine: you browse through words and hashtags to find exactly what you’re trying to find. You can browse a date range as far back as you ‘d like, or just type “Bieber” and view a teen take over the world one reply at a time. This has actually constantly been possible, sort of, through services like Topsy and naturally Google, however, Twitter’s made it much faster, easier, and much more reputable than ever. Doing so, and balancing archival retrieval with the need to browse and emerge popular tweets, was a tough problem to resolve. Yi Zhuang, a Search Infrastructure Engineer, composed a prolonged blog site post about how Twitter managed to build such a pervasive, ever-expanding search engine without going bankrupt and without losing focus on the here and now. Twitter has actually regularly saved tweets permanently (that’s not simply up to the Library of Congress), however, utilized to purge tweets from the search index after only a couple of days or weeks. The new search engine means that you’ll be able to browse for that tweet from ’08 where your good friend DM-failed and never ever seen, or that link somebody tweeted at you two years earlier. Yi Zhuang, a Search Infrastructure Engineer, composed a lengthy blog site post about how Twitter handled to develop such a pervasive, ever-expanding search engine without going bankrupt and without losing focus on the here and now.